Donald Trump, Jeff Sessions, and the Dangers of a Slow-Motion Watergate

Donald Trump, Jeff Sessions, and the Dangers of a Slow-Motion Watergate

Donald Trump
On the night of Saturday, October 20, 1973, Archibald Cox, the Watergate special prosecutor, asked that there be a consequence for actions that the President of the United States had just taken. “Whether ours shall continue to be a government of laws and not of men is now for Congress and ultimately the American people, ” Cox said in a statement. Earlier that day, President Richard Nixon had ordered Cox fired and his office shuttered.
In what became known as the “Saturday Night Massacre, ” Attorney General Elliot Richardson, citing the rule of law, refused to carry out Nixon’s order, and resigned. So did the Deputy Attorney General, William D. Ruckelshaus. .


The Solicitor General, Robert H. Bork, the No.
3 official in the Justice Department, ultimately agreed to dismiss the special prosecutor.The firing, though, proved to be a political debacle for the President. Cox became a national hero; Bork became a national villain. And, in a fatal political blow to Nixon, it accelerated the exposure of an astonishing scheme that brought elements of authoritarian rule to the United States,  by which the President and his aides tried to use the F.B.I. .

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